Spanish Grand Prix: F1 in Barcelona

The Spanish Grand Prix is one of the most anticipated annual events in Catalonia, taking place each May in Montmelo just outside Barcelona, and F1 addicts from around the globe flock to these shores, to enjoy the race along with enthusiastic local aficionados. If you're in town at the same time as Bernie and buddies then a weekend of purring engines, chequered flags, podium finishes - not to mention the rather attractive paddock girls - a weekend of Formula One is hard to beat. We've provided a little info below about the history of the event, practicalities like buying tickets, travel info and tips on booking your accommodation.



History of Spanish Grand Prix in Barcelona

Catalonia has a long racing history, which stretches back to the heady days of 1908 and 1909 when the Catalan Cup was staged on roads around Sitges, just outside Barcelona: Jules Goux won back to back victories with little more in the ways of safety equipment than a pair of goggles and leather gloves. The enthusiasm for racing led to the construction of a permanent track called Sitges-Terrama, which hosted the Spanish Grand Prix in 1923 but was abandoned immediately afterwards. (Today it's the site of a chicken farm, although the 2km track remains in good condition!).

Above: Racing around the Circuit de Catalunya

The Spanish Grand Prix has moved countless times through the last century, and older folk in Barcelona still remember fondly the Montjuic street circuit, a difficult track which wound its way around the city's magical Montjuic mountain. The anticlockwise course, had both a very slow and very fast section of track which made setting up the cars up a challenge. The circuit held it's inaugural Formula One Grand Prix in 1969, but it's last in 1975 was marked by tragedy. The 1975 Spanish Grand Prix was marked by tragedy. Twice F1 world champion Emerson Fittipaldi withdrew in protest before the start of the race, citing the circuit as dangerous (a feeling held by many drivers), and sadly he was proved right: on lap 26 Rolf Stommelen's car skidded off the track, killing five spectators. Formula One never returned to Montjuic.

Throughout the 1980s the Spanish Grand Prix either took place in Jarama or Jerez, but in 1991 work finished on a new track just outside Barcelona in Montmelo: the Circuit de Catalunya (Catalonian Circuit). The same year Formula One moved back to Catalonia where it has remained ever since, arriving one year before the Olympics of 1992.

The Circuit de Catalunya is seen as an all-rounder circuit it as it has 16 corners of varying difficulty combined with long straights (although overtaking on the track is notoriously difficult). The track is 4.655 km long and the lap record is held by Kimi Räikkönen at 1 minute 21.67 seconds. Over the years the track has been kind to the Brits, with Nigel Mansell winning in both 1991 and 1992, Damon Hill in 1994 and more recently Jensen Button in 2009. Flying Finns have certainly had their fair share of Formula One success in Barcelona too with Mika Häkkinen taking first on the podium in 1998-2000 and Kimi popping out the Cava in 2005 and 2008. Naturally none other than Herr Schumacher himself had the most success on the Catalan Circuit with an impressive six victories in Montmelo. Meanwhile Fernando Alonso became the first Spaniard to win the Spanish Grand Prix in 2006. Alonso also came 2nd in 2003 and 2005 and his fine form at the time helped make the race popular amongst locals.

Buying Tickets to the F1 Spanish Grand Prix

Since Alonso fever took over Spain it's become wise to book your tickets to the Spanish Grand Prix in Barcelona well in advance. There are 14 grandstands at the Circuit de Catalunya and ticket prices start at 100 euros for a one day pass and go up to 450 euros for a three day pass (for the main grand stand). A reliable agency to book your seats with are BookF1. Naturally hospitality packages and VIP tickets will set you back several thousands of euros - but hey that's what Formula One is all about right? If you're organising corporate hospitality and want to splash out on a director's box (for up to 30 people) then drop us a line and we'll put in touch with a specialist agent who can do everything for you.



Getting to Montmelo from Barcelona

By car: Montmelo is a small town just 20 km outside Barcelona and for that reason many visitors to the F1 Spanish Grand Prix choose to stay in the cosmopolitan capital of Catalonia and travel to the Circuit de Catalunya each day. You can drive there, and there are 32,000 parking spaces available from around 17 euros for the three days.

By train: Alternatively plenty of transport will take you from Barcelona to Montmelo. Trains run from Barcelona Sants, Passeig de Gracia or Clot rail stations and then from the aptly named Montemelo station shuttle buses will carry you to the race circuit. Train ticket is no more than a couple of euros one way, and the shuttle bus is free for F1 ticket holders. Bear in mind of course that many people will be making the same journey so allow plenty of time.

By coach: Sagalo, a private coach company throw on a bus service each year leaving from Passeig de Joan, 52. Generally speaking the buses depart every 15 minutes or so from 7.30am – 12pm, and return every 15 minutes from 3pm – 6pm. The buses drop you off 300m from the Circuit de Catalunya, take around 45 mins and cost 8 euros.

More Grand Prix Info

The organisers recommend that you bring sun glasses, sun protection/block (you can click here and check the weather a few days in advance), a cap and comfortable footwear. For more information you can click on the official Formula One website or the official Circuit de Catalunya site.

Accommodation & Barcelona Info

For accommodation in Barcelona during the Spanish Grand Prix then look no further than our Sleep section with its directory of hotels and places to stay. We've also got tonnes of great advice for the first-time visitor to Barcelona (or indeed the seasoned pro!), so be sure to read our Barcelona guide, check our restaurant reviews and drop by our Drink section. If you're into your sports, why not pay a visit to Camp Nou, the home of the mighty Barcelona FC - you can catch a match or simply take a tour of the stadium.

add your comments

is access to the circuit easy by travelling from Sitges, where I am staying,along the coast road and would it be less congested on this route?

reviewed by Ron Barker from United Kingdom on Mar.24.2015